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Mar 15 / scott.campbell

Salt Cod – Day 2

So the salt cod sat overnight in the fridge with salt pressed loosely to its surface with cheesecloth.  Overnight, the fish took on a stiffer texture, but nothing like the translucent stiffness I see when I cure salmon (see pic. to the right – very little has changed visually from the salting).  Though noticeably harder, the fish still felt too “soft” to have really taken on lots of salt.  Most of the salt was gone, however, although some flakes clung to the cheesecloth, having refused to melt into the fish.  Note that this was the exception, with large sections of the fish showing no salt left at all. Underneath, the salt had actually drained some water out of the fish, which sat in a small puddle underneath the samples.

When I tested the water activity, the soft texture showed itself to be an illusion.  The water activity was 0.791, already in the “safe” range for pathogenic bacteria, and much lower than the 0.99 reading for fresh cod.  Salt again shows its power to penetrate into tissue like fish at high rates of speed.  The next step is to watch the fish as it dries in the fridge for another 4-7 days.  Fridge humidity is very low, and Ruhlman says the fish will be stiff when done, so I still expect it to lose a lot more water  during the drying phase. Water activity readings will detail the progress of this process.

 

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  1. Marcin / Jun 1 2012

    With fish oils, you do get the Omega-3 s that you need but you also run the chance of gnteitg any of the bad things the fish have in their flesh, such as mercury, pesticides, etc.I would recommend Flax Seed Oil, you not only get your Omega-3 s, but also your Omega-6 s and Omega-9 s in the correct ratio.I use on from Barlean’s which is all organic and after doing research has the best source of what you are looking for and in the correct ratios.

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