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Aug 8 / scott.campbell

Salami, Soppressata, Peperone Done

To be frank, they were probably done some time ago, but I’m just getting around to posting now.  Here’s how each turned out:

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And now a closer look at the salami:

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Of the three, this one looked the best.  Definition was good, as well as the taste to match.  Next, the soppressata:

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This also turned out nicely.  The tangy punch of the fermentation process makes this particularly enjoyable.  Not as much heat as I would have supposed.  Lastly, the peperone:

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You may or may not be able to tell from this picture, but there is not nearly enough fat in this.  As a result, the taste is weak, even though it has plenty of spices.  The universal rule: fat = flavor.

I’m still watching the readings I get from the soil moisture sensors I stabbed the salami, ham, and cheese with:

8-8-13 data

 

The light green line on the bottom is the salami – it continues to drop as it has for some time.  The dark green line is the cheese – it too is losing water at a pretty steady rate, even with the coating of butter on the outside.  Puzzling, though, that the prosciutto isn’t losing any water at this point.  It’s been going for about 2 months, and I’ve seen no change in either sensor that is in it (the green line at the top of the graph, and the green line 2nd from the bottom).  Both lines are flat.  Perhaps it’s losing water so slowly that we haven’t seen any changes yet.

 

 

2 Comments

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  1. mike / Jan 7 2015

    Hey there. Huge fan of your website. My buddy and I are just starting out with charcuterie and you have been a huge help. Those three salumi look amazing. Any chance you’d be willing to share some of your recipes? Thanks in advance and hope to bear from you!

    • scott.campbell / Jan 8 2015

      Thanks for the comments. The only recipes I use are from Michael Ruhlman’s “Charcuterie” and Rytek Kutas’ book. Both can be found on Amazon. Good luck.

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